This Day in Aviation History

This Day in Aviation History

October 29th, 1959

First flight of the Antonov An-24.

The Antonov An-24 (Russian: Антонов Ан-24) (NATO reporting name: Coke) is a 44-seat twin turboprop transport/passenger aircraft designed in 1957 and manufactured in the Soviet Union by the Antonov Design Bureau.

First flown in 1959, over 1,000 An-24s of various marks were built and 880 are still in service worldwide, mostly in the CIS and Africa, with a total of 297 Antonov An-24 aircraft in airline service, as of May 2010. As of 2014, 133 units were still in airline service.

It was designed to replace the veteran piston Ilyushin Il-14 transport on short to medium haul trips, optimised for operating from rough strips and unprepared airports in remote locations. The high-wing layout protects engines and blades from debris, the power-to-weight ratio is higher than that of many comparable aircraft and the machine is rugged, requiring minimal ground support equipment.

Due to its rugged airframe and good performance, the An-24 was adapted to perform many secondary missions such as ice reconnaissance and engine/propeller test-bed, as well as further development to produce the An-26 tactical transport, An-30 photo-mapping/survey aircraft and An-32 tactical transport with more powerful engines. Various projects were envisaged such as a four jet short/medium haul airliner and various iterations of powerplant…..

Source:

Wikipedia, Antonov An-24: http://gstv.us/1P31dQW

YouTube, Antonov 24 Cockpit into Warsaw: http://gstv.us/1P31frT

Please consider supporting Gazing Skyward TV by using our affiliate links when shopping online and becoming a Patron on Patreon. http://gazingskywardtv.com/donate/

Photo from: http://gstv.us/2foBxVr

#avgeek #Antonov #An24 #Coke #airliner #Soviet #Russia #aviation #history

This Day in Aviation History

This Day in Aviation History

October 27th, 1959

First flight of the Myasishchev M-50.

The Myasishchev M-50 (NATO reporting name Bounder) was a Soviet prototype four-jet engine supersonic strategic bomber, which never attained service. Only one prototype was built, which was believed to have first flown in 1957. The M-50 was constructed by the Myasishchev design bureau.

It was a fast jet bomber with four engines: two Dobrynin VD-7 and two VD-7F turbojets. Two engines were located under the wing and two on the tips of its shoulder-mounted, truncated delta wings.

The second M-50 was designated M-52 and carried Zubets 16-17 turbojets, around which the aircraft had been designed. The engine installation was modified, and a second tailplane added to the top of the fin. M-50 participated in a Soviet Aviation Day flyby in 1961. M-52 was completed but was not flight tested.

Like most of the early 1960s supersonic strategic bomber projects, the M-50/52 program was terminated due to the development of the Intercontinental ballistic missiles and the priority assigned to the Soviet space program…..

Source:

Wikipedia, Myasishchev M-50: http://gstv.us/1kIOJ5Y

YouTube, Myasishchev M-50 NATO Code: Bounder: http://gstv.us/1kIOLL1

Please consider supporting Gazing Skyward TV by using our affiliate links when shopping online and becoming a Patron on Patreon. http://gazingskywardtv.com/donate/

Photo from: http://gstv.us/2eFCp50

#avgeek #Myasishchev #M50 #Bounder #military #Soviet #Russia #aviation #history

This Day in Aviation History

This Day in Aviation History

October 4th, 1957

Sputnik is launched into low Earth orbit.

Sputnik 1 (/ˈspʌtnɪk/; Russian: Спутник-1 [ˈsputnʲɪk] “Satellite-1”, or ПС-1 [“PS-1”, i.e. Russian: Простейший Спутник-1 “Elementary Satellite 1”]) was the first artificial Earth satellite. The Soviet Union launched it into an elliptical low Earth orbit on 4 October 1957. It was a 58 cm (23 in) diameter polished metal sphere, with four external radio antennas to broadcast radio pulses. It was visible all around the Earth and its radio pulses were detectable. This surprise 1957 success precipitated the American Sputnik crisis and triggered the Space Race, a part of the larger Cold War. The launch ushered in new political, military, technological, and scientific developments.

Sputnik itself provided scientists with valuable information. The density of the upper atmosphere could be deduced from its drag on the orbit, and the propagation of its radio signals gave information about the ionosphere.

Sputnik 1 was launched during the International Geophysical Year from Site No.1/5, at the 5th Tyuratam range, in Kazakh SSR (now at the Baikonur Cosmodrome). The satellite traveled at about 29,000 kilometers per hour (18,000 mph; 8,100 m/s), taking 96.2 minutes to complete each orbit. It transmitted on 20.005 and 40.002 MHz which were monitored by amateur radio operators throughout the world. The signals continued for 21 days until the transmitter batteries ran out on 26 October 1957. Sputnik 1 burned up on 4 January 1958, as it fell from orbit upon reentering Earth’s atmosphere, after traveling about 70 million km (43.5 million miles) and spending 3 months in orbit…..

Source:

Wikipedia, Sputnik 1: http://gstv.us/1iUSdkC

YouTube, The Story Of The Sputnik Moment: http://gstv.us/1iUSjsg

Please consider supporting Gazing Skyward TV by using our affiliate links when shopping online and becoming a Patron on Patreon. http://gazingskywardtv.com/donate/

Photo from: http://gstv.us/1iUSpjJ

#avgeek #Sputnik #Soviet #Russia #Space #Race #aviation #history

This Day in Aviation History

This Day in Aviation History

August 6th, 1969

A Soviet Mil V-12, the largest helicopter ever built, lifts 40,205.5 kg (88,636 lb.) to a height of 2,255 m (7,400 ft.).

The Mil V-12 (NATO reporting name Homer), given the project number Izdeliye 65, is the largest helicopter ever built. The designation “Mi-12” would have been the name for the production helicopter, and was not applied to the V-12 prototypes.

Design studies for a giant helicopter were started at the Mil OKB in 1959, receiving official sanction in 1961 by the GKAT (Gosudarstvenny Komitet Po Aviatsionnoy Tekhnike – “state committee on aircraft technology”) instructing Mil to develop a helicopter capable of lifting 20 to 25 t (44,000 to 55,000 lb). The GKAT directive was followed by a more detailed specification for the V-12 with hold dimensions similar to the Antonov An-22, intended to lift major items of combat materiel as well as 8K67, 8K75 and 8K82 inter-continental ballistic missiles (ICBM).

Source:

Wikipedia, Mil V-12: http://gstv.us/1NaTltL

YouTube, Mil V-12/Mi-12 NATO Code: Homer: http://gstv.us/1NaTk9b

Photo from: http://gstv.us/1NaTE7T

#avgeek #Mil #V12 #Soviet #Russia #helicopter #military #aviation #history

This Day in Aviation History

This Day in Aviation History

June 28th, 1988

First flight of the Sukhoi Su-27M.

The Sukhoi Su-35 (Russian: Сухой Су-35; NATO reporting name: Flanker-E) is a designation for two separate, heavily upgraded derivatives of the Su-27 ‘Flanker’ jet plane. They are single-seat, twin-engine, supermaneuverable multirole fighters, designed by Sukhoi and built by Komsomolsk-on-Amur Aircraft Production Association (KnAAPO).

The first variant was designed during the 1980s, when Sukhoi sought to upgrade its high-performance Su-27, and was initially known as the Su-27M. Later re-designated Su-35, this derivative incorporated aerodynamic refinements with increased maneuverability, enhanced avionics, longer range, and more powerful engines. The first Su-35 prototype, converted from a Su-27, made its maiden flight in June 1988. More than a dozen of these were built, some of which were used by the Russian Knights aerobatic demonstration team…

Source:

Wikipedia, Sukhoi Su-35: http://gstv.us/1GI3BWd

YouTube, Building the SU 27 – The Best Fighter Jet in the World: http://gstv.us/1S7S8Ur

Photo from: http://gstv.us/1S7RAOp

#avgeek #Sukhoi #Su27M #military #Soviet #Russia #aviation #history

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!