This Day in Aviation History

This Day in Aviation History

November 6th, 1957

First flight of the Fairey Rotodyne.

The Fairey Rotodyne was a 1950s British compound gyroplane designed and built by Fairey Aviation and intended for commercial and military applications. A development of the earlier Gyrodyne, which had established a world helicopter speed record, the Rotodyne featured a tip-jet-powered rotor that burned a mixture of fuel and compressed air bled from two wing-mounted Napier Eland turboprops. The rotor was driven for vertical takeoffs, landings, and hovering, as well as low-speed translational flight, and autorotated during cruise flight with all engine power applied to two propellers.

One prototype was built. Although the Rotodyne was promising in concept and successful in trials, the programme was eventually canceled. The termination has been attributed to the type failing to attract any commercial orders; this was in part due to concerns over the high levels of rotor tip-jet noise generated inflight. Politics – the development was government funded – had also played a role in the lack of orders, which ultimately doomed the project…..

Source:

Wikipedia, Fairey Rotodyne: http://gstv.us/1NvIWvJ

YouTube, Why The Vertical Takeoff Airliner Failed: The Rotodyne Story: https://gstv.us/2oPuOKf

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This Day in Aviation History

This Day in Aviation History

October 16th, 1937

First flight of the Short Sunderland.

The Short S.25 Sunderland was a British flying boat patrol bomber developed for the Royal Air Force (RAF) by Short Brothers. It took its service name from the town (latterly, city) and port of Sunderland in northeast England.

Based in part upon the S.23 Empire flying boat, the flagship of Imperial Airways, the S.25 was extensively re-engineered for military service. It was one of the most powerful and widely used flying boats throughout the Second World War, and was involved in countering the threat posed by German U-boats in the Battle of the Atlantic. RAF Sunderlands also saw service throughout the Korean War and continued in service until 1959. It also took part in the Berlin airlift. Sunderlands remained in service with the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) until 1967.

Sunderlands converted for civil use, known as Short Sandringhams, continued in airline operation until 1974. A single airworthy example remains on display in Florida at Fantasy of Flight…..

Source:

Wikipedia, Short Sunderland: http://gstv.us/1LjGzY4

YouTube, Sunderland Flying Boat (1940-1949): http://gstv.us/1LjGAeI

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This Day in Aviation History

This Day in Aviation History

September 27th, 1964

First flight of the BAC TSR-2.

The British Aircraft Corporation TSR-2 was a cancelled Cold War strike and reconnaissance aircraft developed by the British Aircraft Corporation (BAC) for the Royal Air Force (RAF) in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The TSR-2 was designed to penetrate a well-defended forward battle area at low altitudes and very high speeds, and then attack high-value targets in the rear with nuclear or conventional weapons. Another intended combat role was to provide high-altitude, high-speed stand-off, side-looking, radar and photographic imagery and signals intelligence, reconnaissance. Some of the most advanced aviation technology of the period was incorporated in order to make it the highest-performing aircraft in the world in its projected missions. Only one airframe flew and test flights and weight rise during design indicated that the aircraft would be unable to meet its original stringent design specifications. The design specifications had been reduced as the results of flight testing.

The TSR-2 was the victim of ever-rising costs and inter-service squabbling over Britain’s future defence needs, which led to the controversial decision to scrap the programme in 1965. With the election of a new government, the TSR-2 was cancelled due to rising costs, in favour of purchasing an adapted version of the General Dynamics F-111, a decision that itself was later rescinded as costs and development times increased. The replacements included the Blackburn Buccaneer and McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II, both of which had previously been considered and rejected early in the TSR-2 procurement process. Eventually, the smaller swing-wing Panavia Tornado was developed and adopted by a European consortium to fulfill broadly similar requirements to the TSR-2….

Source:

Wikipedia, BAC TSR-2: http://gstv.us/1FApGLw

YouTube, Classic British Jets – BAC TSR-2 – The Untold Story: https://gstv.us/2n0PfCU

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This Day in Aviation History

This Day in Aviation History

September 25th, 1945

First flight of the de Havilland Dove.

The de Havilland DH.104 Dove was a British short-haul airliner developed and manufactured by de Havilland. It was a monoplane successor to the prewar de Havilland Dragon Rapide biplane. The design came about from the Brabazon Committee report which, amongst other aircraft types, called for a British-designed short-haul feeder for airlines.

The Dove was a popular aircraft and is considered to be one of Britain’s most successful postwar civil designs, in excess of 500 aircraft were manufactured between 1946 and 1967. Several military variants were operated, such as the Devon by the Royal Air Force, the Sea Devon by the Royal Navy, the type also saw service with a number of overseas military forces…..

Source:

Wikipedia, de Havilland Dove: http://gstv.us/1G5BAbl

YouTube, Reisen wie die Queen 1955 – De Havilland Dove 1.04 MK8 – LTU Classic: http://gstv.us/1G5BBMc

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This Day in Aviation History

This Day in Aviation History

September 4th, 1949

First flight of the Avro 707.

The Avro 707 (also known as Type 707) was a British experimental aircraft built to test the tailless thick delta wing configuration chosen for the Avro 698 jet bomber, later named the Vulcan. In particular, the low-speed characteristics of such aircraft were not well known at the time. Aerodynamically, it was a ⅓-scale version of the Vulcan…..

Source:

Wikipedia, Avro 707: http://gstv.us/1Kut3pv

YouTube, Experinental AVRO 707 bomber: http://gstv.us/2wTOj5X

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